Lou Brock Dies at 81
Lou Brock Dies at 81

Lou Brock Dies at 81 Baseball Hall of Famer Known for Stealing Bases 2020

Lou Brock Dies at 81 Baseball Hall of Famer Known for Stealing Bases Tweets on Twitter 2020

Lou Brock Dies at 81 Baseball Hall of Famer Known for Stealing Bases

Lou Brock Baseball Hall of Famer Innovator Dies https://nytimes.com/2020/09/06/sports/baseball/lou-brock-dead.html?smid=tw-share Another baseball immortal has passed “What the hell are you doing w/that camera?’ ‘Taking home movies,’.said Brock I don’t want to be in your damn movies,’ Drysdale said & threw at him the next time he was up

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“When he heard about Robinson, ‘I felt pride in being alive. The baseball field was my fantasy of what life offered.’” RIP Hall of Famer Lou Brock, the son of sharecroppers who hit rocks w/tree branches growing up instead of playing organized ball


I watched Lou Brock in left field for the Cubs at my first major league game. At Candlestick. Willie Mays hit a grand slam to win it for the Jantz. RIP one of the truly great.

Rest in Peace Lou Brock! I was fond of learning how he shattered Ty Cobb’s all-time stolen base record to end up 938 over his career.
‘“What the hell are you doing with that camera, Brock.’
‘“Just taking home movies,’ said Brock. ‘“I don’t want to be in your goddamn movies, Brock,’ Drysdale said, and threw at him the next time he was up.”


Lou Brock, the St. Louis Cardinals’ Hall of Fame outfielder who became the greatest base-stealer the major leagues had ever known when he eclipsed the single-season and career records for steals in a career spanning two decades, has died

Lou Brock Dies at 81 Baseball Hall of Famer Known for Stealing Bases Videos on Youtube 2020

Source: Current News

Lou Brock, the St. Louis Cardinals’ Hall of Fame outfielder who became the greatest base-stealer the major leagues had ever known when he eclipsed the single-season and career records for steals in a career spanning two decades, died on Sunday. He was 81. Dick Zitzmann, Brock’s agent, confirmed his death to The Associated Press but did not provide any details. In 2017, Brock began receiving treatment for multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer. His left leg was amputated in 2015 as a result of a diabetes-related infection. On June 15, 1964, a floundering Cardinals team traded one of the National League’s leading pitchers for an outfielder who had failed to live up to his promise. That deal, sending the right-hander Ernie Broglio to the Chicago Cubs for Brock as the centerpiece of a six-player swap, became one of the most one-sided trades in baseball history, but hardly in the way that many envisioned. Broglio won only seven games for the Cubs over the next two and a half seasons, then retired. Brock, sought by Cardinals Manager Johnny Keane for his largely untapped speed, helped take St. Louis to the 1964 World Series championship and went on to turn around games year after year with his feet and his bat. Brock’s 118 stolen bases in 1974 eclipsed Maury Wills’s single-season record of 104, set in 1962, and his 938 career steals broke Ty Cobb’s mark of 893. He led the National League in steals eight times. Although Rickey Henderson broke Brock’s stolen-base records, Brock’s luster remained undimmed. A left-handed batter, he had 3, 023 hits and he hit. 300 eight times. He helped propel the Cardinals to three pennants and two World Series championships and he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985. Louis Clark Brock was born on June 18, 1939, in El Dorado, Ark., and grew up in Collinston, La., in a family of sharecroppers who picked cotton. He attended a one-room schoolhouse, but at the age of 9, he was inspired by possibilities beyond the poverty and segregation of the rural South. He was listening to one night to a feed from radio station KMOX in St. Louis. Harry Caray was broadcasting a game between the Cardinals and Jackie Robinson’s Brooklyn Dodgers, the summer after Robinson broke the major leagues’ color barrier, a time when, as Brock put it, “Jim Crow was king. ” I was searching the dial of an old Philco radio, ” Brock recalled. When he heard about Robinson, “I felt pride in being alive. The baseball field was my fantasy of what life offered. ”As a boy, Brock never played organized baseball. Instead of a ball and bat, he swatted rocks with tree branches. But he received an academic scholarship to Southern University in Baton Rouge, La., and played baseball there, catching the attention of Buck O’Neil, the longtime Negro league player, and manager who was scouting for the Cubs. The Cubs’ organization signed Brock in August 1960, and he made his major league debut late in the ’61 season. But two summers later, he was batting only.

Source: sumon infosec

#LouBrock Lou Brock, one of the best hitters and base stealers in baseball history, died Sunday at the age of 81. A Brock family representative confirmed his death to the St. Louis Cardinals. Known as a “stolen base specialist” according to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Brock played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball, with 16 of those for the Cardinals. He is one of 32 players to hit 3,000 hits or more and has the second-most stolen bases in MLB history. Brock was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985
St. Louis Cardinals legend and Baseball Hall of Famer Lou Brock died Sunday at the age of 81, ESPN reported before the Cardinals-Cubs matchup Sunday night. Brock has battled multiple health conditions in recent years, including multiple myeloma, a type of cancer that affects the blood and bones. After beginning his MLB career as a member of the Chicago Cubs, Brock was sent to the Cardinals in a 1964 trade that has gone down as one of the most lopsided in baseball history. In that first season with the team, Brock would help lead the Cardinals to a World Series championship.
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